East Coast of Australia holidays, Travel Tips - Abbey Travel, Ireland

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8 reasons why there’s nowhere like Australia’s East Coast



There’s a particular pang of jealousy reserved for the customers who begin with “flight to Sydney please, and flight out of Cairns. Six weeks or so. Oh and I’ll need car hire”. 
Australia’s East Coast punches above its weight when it comes to incredible scenery oozing adventure and ease of getting around. There’s nowhere like it, and here are 8 reasons why:

1. The Grand Scale

There’s a reason you’ll find ‘Great’ as a prefix on main attractions like the Great Ocean Road and Great Barrier Reef. Beaches, trails and open road stretch for miles, and there’s only a handful of people to share it with. It’s epic out there, and it’s there for the exploring. 

2. Adventure on the doorstep 

Very few destinations can compete with the East Coast for its perfect balance of leisure and adventure. Adventure-leisure (it sounds better in an Aussie accent) means going off the beaten track, but still getting decent roads, charming villages and endearing wilderness. It’s going shopping and surfing on the same day; rock-climbing and wine tours in the same place, and seeing a rainforest and rugby match in the same week. 

3. The underwater scenery 

It’s the reef that launched a thousand postcards, but the Great Barrier Reef still looks better in real life. The electric colours and sheer quirkiness of the fish are the envy of every neon-clad raver. The turtles casually swimming by are a highlight for most people. 

4. A trail of two cities

There’s actually an entire continent of great ocean road in Australia. The coastal drive from Sydney to Melbourne, for example, is gorgeous. Give four days to make your way through fishing villages including Lakes Entrance, Wilsons Promontory National Park and the hot springs of Mornington Peninsula. That’s not even mentioning the beaches… 

5. Sydney’s Blue Mountains

We’re starting a petition to replace ‘Blue’ with ‘Great’, because Sydney’s Blue Mountains don’t get the acclaim they deserve. It’s all the better for the visitors who do seek them out though, as you’ll mostly have the caves, rivers, and viewpoints to yourselves. The canyons wouldn’t look out of place in Nevada, but the most staggering fact is that it is a mere hour from Sydney. 

6. The whitest sand in the world

With all the surfing, sailing, camping and BBQs, it’s easy to forget that the sand beneath your feet is pretty fine. The beaches of Jervis Bay in New South Wales have powder-fine sand and turquoise waters to equal the best in the world. Most especially, Hyams Beach laughs in the face of The Maldives – it officially has the world’s whitest sand. 

7. The islands

You could spend a very pleasant lifetime exploring each one of Australia’s 8222 islands, but for those with only a few weeks, there are some blockbusters to see. 
Dunk Island on the Great Barrier Reef is known as the ‘island of peace and plenty’, with beaches of pearly white sand, palm trees, tropical forest and even a volcanic peak. Lord Howe is one of only four islands on the UNESCO World Heritage List, and home to the world’s southernmost coral reef. Fraser Island is special because it’s the world's largest sand island, and it’s also great for humpback whale-watching. Also, Kangaroo Island is an ecological haven for native wildlife. 

8. The weather

Only the Irish truly understand how spoiled the Aussies are by constant blue skies. Their summer is hot, and gets steamy as you go north, but even June and July (their ‘winter’) is pleasant. You’ll actually laugh at the temperature they wear scarves for. 
However long you can spend on the East Coast of Australia, we can build a package to suit you. Call to discuss with one of our Australia experts on 01 8047188 or check out our website for great deals.
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