Guinea - Abbey Travel, Ireland

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Welcome to Guinea


Those who travel to the Republic of Guinea will find this beautiful and intriguing west African country to be a fantastic getaway destination.

Surrounded by Guinea-Bissau, Senegal, Mali, Côte d'Ivoire, Liberia and Sierra Leone, the country has somewhat illogical borders that are a relic of the colonial era when this region was shared out between European powers. Today those borders enclose a very diverse population of ethnic and linguistic groups, and a varied terrain that ranges from expansive savannah in the south to the mountainous, heavily forested highlands in the north-west.

Indeed Guinea's chief attraction is its spectacular and mostly unspoiled natural scenery. West Africa's three great rivers - the Gambia, the Senegal and the Niger - all originate here. The splendid Guinea Highlands is centered around Mount Nimba, the highest point in the country, while the Fouta Djalon highlands is renowned for its incredible views and superb hiking. Other places of interest in Guinea include the spiritual centre of Kankan, the high altitude town of Dalaba, party-mad Faranah, and the incredible beaches of Cape Verga.

The population is mostly Muslim, French speaking and rural, with the exception of the pleasant and relatively cosmopolitan capital Conakry, located on the island of Tombo. The city is renowned for its lively music scene and attractive layout.

Guinea's climate is tropical but mild with constant temperatures throughout the year. The rainy season runs from June to September.

Despite its worthwhile attractions Guinea remains one of the least visited countries in Africa. Visas can be hard to get, which may deter those travellers planning a trip here. The government, despite some recent concessions, remains a de facto dictatorship which means few freedoms for the people but generally safe conditions for visitors.

Information & Facts


As most Guineans are practising Muslims, conservative dress (especially for women) and judicious behaviour is essential, especially during religious festivals and celebrations. Greetings are very important in Guinea, as is respect for one's elders - offer a firm handshake and inquire about their well-being, but avoid making direct eye contact with seniors. Guineans are wary of photography, so ask permission before taking anyone's photo, and avoid taking pictures of military buildings or installations. It is also considered rude to show the soles of your feet or shoes, and to touch or move objects with your feet. Visitors should avoid using their left hand when greeting others, or when eating, as it is considered 'haram' (impure).

Duty Free

Visitors to Guinea may import up to 1,000 cigarettes/250 cigars/1kg of tobacco, one bottle of alcohol, and an amount of perfume reasonable for personal use.

Passport Visa

All foreign passengers to Guinea must hold return or onward tickets, and the necessary travel documentation for their next destination; OR, sufficient funds equal to a return airfare, and a Certificat d'Hebergement (Certificate of Accommodation). Also note that: (i) the government of Guinea does not accept wet stamp visas for entry into the country (only sticker-type visas are valid); (ii) every visitor staying longer than three months in Guinea is considered an alien resident, and has to hold an Alien Registration Card (to be obtained from the Direction de la Surete in Conakry); and (iii) a yellow fever vaccination certificate is required to enter Guinea. NOTE: It is highly recommended that your passport has at least six months validity remaining after your intended date of departure from your travel destination. Immigration officials often apply different rules to those stated by travel agents and official sources.

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