City Breaks to Oslo from Dublin, Cheap Weekend Breaks to Oslo from Ireland, Last Minute City Breaks & Short Breaks Deals to Oslo - Abbey Travel, Ireland



Begin Your Search

    • 16+ yrs

    • 12-15 yrs

    • 2-11 yrs

    • 0-23 mnth

Found Item

Welcome to Oslo


City Breaks to Oslo

Bounded by fjords and forested hills, Oslo offers spectacular scenery and a wealth of attractions. City breaks to Oslo from Dublin are ideal in summer or winter. Scandinavia’s sunniest city has a compact centre with a vibrant nightlife.


Information & Facts

Things to do
For outdoor meals and drinks try Aker Brygge where you can sit among the glass buildings and enjoy fjord views or hang out with the hipsters in the trendy bars in Grünerløkka. Cheap weekend breaks to Oslo from Ireland are perfect for visiting the Munch museum to see the famous Scream painting. Take the 15 minute boat trip to  the Bygdoy Peninsula where you will find some of Olso's best museums as well as beaches and hiking and cycling trails. Last minute city breaks & short break deals to Oslo are perfect for taking a trip to Holmenkollen to try out the 60m ski jump or just enjoy the panoramic views of Olso from the platform. The amusement park Tusenfryd is one of the biggest in Norway.

Although well into the northern latitudes, Oslo's climate is fairly temperate thanks to warm air being wafted across the Atlantic from the Gulf Stream. Summer weather in Oslo is mild and pleasant, with frequent hot spells, and plenty of long sunny days. In winter temperatures hover just above or below freezing. Snow is plentiful in winter, making the city a great winter sports venue, and rainfall is spread across the year, the rainiest month being August.


Norwegian is the official language, but English is widely understood.


The official currency is Norwegian Krone (NOK) divided into 100 ore. Larger establishments accept major credit cards and travellers cheques. Use of credit cards is widespread, with Eurocard/Mastercard, Visa, American Express and Diners Club the most common. Visitors should be aware that credit cards are generally not accepted as a means of payment in Norwegian supermarkets and petrol stations. Foreign currency and travellers cheques can be exchanged at banks and major post offices, as well as many hotels and travel agents, although for poorer rates. ATMs are available in all towns and cities.


Local time is GMT +1 (GMT +2 between the last Sunday in March and the Saturday before the last Sunday in October).

Situated on the Bygdøy Peninsula, the Kon-Tiki Museum contains the renowned balsawood raft, the Kon-Tiki, on which Thor Heyerdahl made his famous journey across the Pacific in 1947 to prove the theory that the first Polynesian settlers could have sailed the 4,300 miles (6,923km) between Peru and Polynesia. The museum also contains the original reed raft, Ra II, on which Heyerdahl sailed across the Atlantic in 1970. Besides the rafts there is a huge stuffed whale shark, artefacts from his expeditions and exhibits from his visits to Easter Island, and an intriguing collection of archaeological finds from Easter Island, Galapagos, East Polynesia and Peru.

Situated on the Bygdøy Peninsula, the Viking Ship Museum houses three 9th-century Viking ships that were excavated from ritual burial mounds in the south of Norway. Their excellent condition is due to the clay in which they were embalmed. Viking ships were used as tombs for royalty who were buried with everything they might need in their life after death. The biggest and best preserved of the ships is the Gokstad, and the finest is the Oseberg, a richly ornamented dragon ship with an intricately carved animal head post, that was the burial chamber of a Viking queen. The elegantly carved sleigh used by the Viking royalty, and a hoard of treasure was found on the buried ship and is displayed at the back of the museum. Raised platforms allow visitors to view the inside of the ship's hulls.

Vigeland Park is the city's most visited attraction, a vast green area of duck ponds, trees and lawns that is a monument to the celebrated Norwegian sculptor Gustav Vigeland, who spent 40 years creating the life-size statues that decorate the walkways and open spaces. There are more than 200 works presenting the human form in a variety of poses and conveying a range of emotions. At the centre of the park is the most impressive piece, the Monolith, a gigantic mass of writhing bodies carved from a single column of stone, and believed to be the largest granite sculpture in the world at a height of 46ft (14m). Surrounding the column are groups of human sculptures in various forms of interaction with each other. The most famous and most photographed piece is the Angry Boy, a fat child stamping his foot. There are many more sculptures to be seen in the park and in the nearby Vigeland Museum, featuring a display on the development of the artist's work and his sketches and plaster originals.

} ());
ACCEPT COOKIESTo give you the best possible experience, this site uses cookies. Using this site means you agree to our use of cookies. We have published a cookies policy, which you should read to find out more about the cookies we use. View cookies policy.