Lloret de Mar - Abbey Travel, Ireland

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Welcome to Lloret de Mar

Lloret de Mar

History may have given way to high-rise hotels, and fishing to foam parties in this former Catalonian trading port, but the region's fiery spirit is still evident, which is why Lloret de Mar is regarded as the liveliest holiday spot on the Costa Brava. As a resort, the town caters for the 18-30s and families with children. There are seemingly hundreds of British bars, discos and clubs to choose from, and the days are packed with programmes of beach frolics and fun. The resort has five rough sandy beaches, a massive water park, aquatic zoo and a theme park. For a taste of the real Spain visitors can revel in the local cuisine or gather in the town's Placa de la Vila on Saturday evenings to join in when locals dance the traditional Catalonian Sardana dance.

Information & Facts

Spanish is the official language, but English is widely understood in areas frequented by tourists. Catalan, Galician and Basque are spoken in the relevant areas.

Spain's official currency is the Euro (EUR). One Euro is divided into 100 cents. Money can be exchanged at bureaux de change and major hotels, but banks give the best rates. All major credit cards and travellers cheques are widely accepted at most hotels, restaurants, and shops. ATMs are widespread and are generally the cheapest and most convenient method of obtaining money.

Local time is GMT +1 (GMT +2 between the last Sunday in March and the Saturday before the last Sunday in October). The Canary Islands: GMT (GMT +1 in summer).

The historic lakeside town of Banyoles just north of Girona is well known for hosting international rowing events, but it is also a fun, attractive and interesting place to visit and perhaps work off some energy in a pedal-boat or on a bicycle. The bright blue lake itself is the only one in the world fed by two merging subterranean rivers, the clean water flowing in at 600 litres a second. There are numerous options available to those wanting to take to the water, from a swimming dock to cruises or hire boats, and a grassy bank for sunbathers or a network of shady footpaths for those who prefer the shore. The town of Banyoles dates from 812, having grown up around a Benedictine monastery, and its old section is full of fascinating ancient buildings. The natural history and archaeological museums are worth visiting, and all is centred on a lovely arcaded square where a traditional market has been held every Wednesday since medieval times.

The busy fishing village of Cadaques draws plenty of visitors, but they do not come for the local beach, which is narrow and stony. Rather the resort town's attractions are its picturesque natural harbour, some excellent restaurants, numerous galleries, fashion and art and craft shops, and the former home-turned-museum of world renowned surrealist painter, Salvador Dali, sited in Portlligat Bay just to the north of the town. Dali's somewhat bizarre home consists of a labyrinthine cluster of fishermen's huts, added to the original building in various stages by the artist over a period of 40 years. Visitors are conducted through the house and garden in small groups, having pre-booked.

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