City Breaks to Seville from Dublin, Cheap Weekend Breaks to Seville from Ireland, Last Minute City Breaks & Short Breaks Deals to Seville - Abbey Travel, Ireland



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Welcome to Seville


City Breaks to Seville

On the river Guadalquivir, Seville is noted for its Moorish and Christian architecture and famed for its love of flamenco and fiesta. Cheap weekend breaks to Seville from Ireland are ideal for experiencing the narrow atmospheric alleys of the Jewish quarter that surround the Plaza Santa Cruz, decorated with colourful ceramic work. 


Information & Facts

Things to do
City breaks to Seville from Dublin give you the opportunity to take in the Alcazar, a 14th century palace with ornamental patios, exquisite tilework, splendid salons, and beautiful gardens.  At Santa Maria de La Sede cathedral climb to the top of its Giralda tower for panoramic views. In Parque de Maria Luisa take a horse and carriage ride in the shade of tall trees.  Last minute city breaks & short break deals to Seville are perfect for exploring the city whenever takes your fancy. 

Spanish is the official language, but English is widely understood in areas frequented by tourists. Catalan, Galician and Basque are spoken in the relevant areas.


Spain's official currency is the Euro (EUR). One Euro is divided into 100 cents. Money can be exchanged at bureaux de change and major hotels, but banks give the best rates. All major credit cards and travellers cheques are widely accepted at most hotels, restaurants, and shops. ATMs are widespread and are generally the cheapest and most convenient method of obtaining money.


Local time is GMT +1 (GMT +2 between the last Sunday in March and the Saturday before the last Sunday in October). The Canary Islands: GMT (GMT +1 in summer).

The site of Seville's Moorish Alcazar palace has been occupied by the city's rulers since Roman times, and has been a favoured residence of Spanish kings since the Middle Ages. The palace was built by the Moors in the 7th century, and has been added to and altered by successive occupants ever since. First to enlarge the building was the infamous al-Mu'tadid of the Abbadids, who reputedly kept a harem of 800 women and decorated the terraces with flowers planted in the skulls of his decapitated enemies. Of the early Christian additions most notable is the colonnaded quadrangle of the Patio of the Maids. The golden-domed Salon de los Embajadores was a wing built by Fernando and Isabel, and was where the royal pair welcomed Columbus back after his discovery of America. The palace is set in beautiful gardens.

This large lump of limestone stuck to the end of the Iberian Peninsula is as famous for its bizarre geology as it is for its overly-friendly furry friends. Though many countries have claimed the beacon over the years, it's officially owned by the British government and thus it is advised that tourists exchange Euros for Pounds for ease and economy. The Rock of Gibraltar is easily conquered by cable car, but it's worthwhile to hire a guide (around 25 USD per person) to explain the countless caves and mites, and to coax the wild monkeys to give a toothy grin while atop your head. On clear days visitors can even view North Africa.

Regarded as one of the loveliest parks in Europe, this half-mile area in southern Seville, near the port, is planted with palms, orange trees, elms and Mediterranean pines. Bright and beautiful flower beds vie for the eye with hidden bowers, ponds and pavilions in this little paradise, which was designed in the 1920s and thus reflects a mix of Art Deco and Mudejar styling. The park was originally part of Seville's world exposition, which brought a burst of building and rejuvenation during the 1920s, which included the re-direction of the Guadalquivir River and the construction of some opulent buildings, like the stylish Guatemala building off the Paseo de la Palmera. Also fronting the park is the city's archaeological museum, focusing on the Romans and prehistory of the province of Seville. Near the park is the Royal Tobacco Factory (today part of the university), immortalised by the fictional operatic gypsy heroine, Carmen, who worked there.

A restored convent, dating back to 1612 and hidden in a tiny plaza off Calle de Alfonso XII in Seville, houses one of Spain's most important art collections. Highlights here are the religious paintings of Seville's own Esteban Murillo, but the collection also includes other Seville School artists such as the macabre works of Juan de Vales Leal and Francisco de Zurbaran. There are also two paintings by El Greco among the exhibits.

Ronda is an easy and entertaining escape from the city. Ambling about the cobbled streets, handsome mansions and well-established artisan boutiques is enough to fill a day, but no visit would be complete without a trip to Ronda's most famous attraction, the Puento Nueveo(The New Bridge). The structure straddles a magnificent chasm and connects the old town to the new, while allowing visitors a vista of the region unfolding around them.

Visitors usually need to visit a tourist office to obtain a detailed map of the winding alleys, gateways and courtyards of this enchanting and fascinating section of Seville, a former Jewish ghetto, where every street corner has a romantic legend attached to it. The balconies and windowsills are all festooned with flowers and the fragrance of jasmine pervades the air in this picturesque corner of the city, which can be reached via the Calle Rodrigo Caro. Some of the sights to look for are the Hospital de los Venerables, which contains Sevillian art works; the beautiful mansions in the Calle Lope de Rueda; the Convent de San Jose which boasts relics of Saint Teresa of Avila; and the Iglesia de Santa Maria la Blanca which features Murillo's 'Last Supper'.

As a monument to Christian glory, Seville's cathedral has few equals, in fact it is still undecided whether it is the largest church in the world when measured against St Peter's in Rome and St Paul's in London. This massive Gothic edifice took more than a century to build, after a group of religious fanatics decided in 1401 to build a church so wonderful that 'those who come after us will take us for madmen'. The cathedral was built on the site of the Almohad mosque, which was demolished to make way for it, leaving no more than the minaret, built in 1198, known as La Giralda, which is today open to tourists to climb. The interior of the cathedral contains some marvellous sights in its 44 chapels, including mahogany choir stalls made from recycled Austrian railway sleepers. It is claimed that Christopher Columbus' remains are here in a tomb dedicated to him, but there is some controversy over this. Artworks to be seen include gilded panels, glittering icons, and intricately carved altarpieces.

The 'tower of gold', overlooking the Guadalquivir River, was part of the original Moorish city fortification, built in the 13th century, and is believed to have been covered with gold tiles imported from the Americas. The tower has been restored and now houses a maritime museum, which contains drawings and engravings depicting Seville in its heyday.

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