Dalyan - Abbey Travel, Ireland

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    • 16+ yrs

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Welcome to Dalyan


Unlike neighbouring holiday resorts, Dalyan is a largely undeveloped, tranquil village offering a significant number of natural and historical attractions, as well as classic Turkish friendliness and hospitality. Due to the fact that nearby Iztuzu beach is one of the world's few remaining breeding grounds for Loggerhead (Caretta Caretta) turtles, an effort has been made to conserve the area's astounding natural beauty.

The town is set on the winding Dalyan River that flows between the Mediterranean Sea and Lake Koycegiz, and on the other side of the river are the ruins of the ancient city of Caunos, dating back to the 3rd century. A Dalyan holiday must is a boat trip to the 2.5-mile (4km) beach (about a 40-minute journey) that transports visitors through tall reeds, to 2,300-year-old Lycian cliff tombs and the ruins at Caunos, and finally to the large sandbar at the turtle beach in Koycegiz. A quicker, but less scenic ride is by dolmus.

Nearby thermal springs at Sultaniye, and the Dalyan mud baths are also not to be missed and make for an out of the ordinary holiday experience. The surrounding wetlands are a haven for a variety of wildlife and birds, and the town is offset by a backdrop of pine-covered mountains and lush fields, making Dalyan a perfect destination for nature-lovers.

For those looking to party until dawn the busier holiday resorts such as Marmaris would be better suited, but for the more discerning traveller there are plenty of activities and excursions to enjoy, local delicacies to savour and spectacular scenery to delight in while on holiday in Dalyan.

Information & Facts

Turkish is the official language, but English is widely understood in the main tourist areas.

The official currency is the New Turkish Lira (TRY), which was introduced on 1 January 2005, whereby six zeros were dropped from the TL and the sub-unit New Kurush was created. Currency can be exchanged at banks, exchange booths, post offices, airports and ferry ports; banks have the worst rates and highest commissions, but will exchange lesser known foreign currencies. Banks open mainly Monday to Friday, but some are open daily in tourist areas. ATMs are widely available in major cities and tourist areas, but Turkish ATM keypads usually do not have letters of the alphabet on their keys. Most bank branches have ATMs which accept Cirrus and Plus. Major credit cards are widely accepted; the most popular are Visa or MasterCard, but American Express is accepted in many of the more expensive places. Travellers cheques can be exchanged at some banks and currency exchange offices, but are not as welcome as cash or credit cards. US dollars or Euros are preferred. Some pensions and hotels in the most popular destinations accept US dollars as payment.

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